05 Oct, 2010 Last updated: 12 Dec, 2014

This study found that "job strain", where workers have little control over their job, but who are under high pressure to perform, accounts for 17 per cent of depression in working women and 13 per cent in working men.

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Resource 1: Full report: Estimating the economic benefits of eliminating job strain as a risk factor for depression (1.48MB)
Resource 2: Summary: Estimating the economic benefits of eliminating job strain as a risk factor for depression (1.33MB)

The Estimating the economic benefits of eliminating job strain as a risk factor for depression study found that “Job Strain”, where workers have little control over their job, but who are under high pressure to perform, accounts for 17 per cent of depression in working women and 13 per cent in working men.

This study was funded by VicHealth and led by Associate Professor Tony LaMontagne from the University of Melbourne School of Population Health and Dr Kristy Sanderson from the Menzies Research Institute, Tasmania.

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