15 May, 2020 Last updated: 01 Jul, 2020

How Surfing Victoria is keeping people fit and balanced at home via social media

The coronavirus pandemic has thrown many organisations into the deep end of learning about technology and ways to maintain communication and ongoing participation in health promotion activities.

While delivering a sports or health promotion program online takes some preparation, you don’t have to do it alone. VicHealth has put together a series of fact sheets on digitisation, providing tips and information to help you adapt your programs.

 

A sports case study from Surfing Victoria

Monica Fleming, the Program Development Coordinator at Surfing Victoria is pleased with the response to a series of YouTube videos they have produced to keep people active during coronavirus restrictions.

“The YouTube videos have increased our post engagement and audience reach on social media by about double,” she says. 

The Surfing Victoria Coasting stand up paddle boarding (SUP) programs for women and teens aim to give women of all ages a chance to get active with maximum time on the water.

And the coronavirus restrictions could have made it difficult to connect with participants and meet funding requirements.

Instead, it’s created opportunities to produce resources that will be useful long after the virus has gone.

Thanks to instructor, Rikki, who is studying a Sports and Exercise Science degree, Surfing Victoria have produced a 4-week ‘Keeping SUP fit at home’ program.

It teaches exercises that focus on developing the micro skills, improving balance and strengthening the major muscle groups needed for the sport. 

 

Selecting channels and platforms

The new videos are available on Instagram and Facebook.

“If you know your audience, it helps dictate where you go next,” says Monica. 

“Because we have specific programs for teens, we know that Instagram is best for them, whereas the older women use Facebook, so we post there too. The more interactive videos have been a big step up from our usual offerings; the ‘pretty pictures’ you find on Instagram.”

Monica describes the process as one of trial and error. But she’s quickly getting up to speed with video editing programs like iMovie and trialling DaVinci Resolve for more features.

 

Incorporating mental health

“Our next goal is to incorporate mental health into the sessions. We know that connection and mental health are important issues for young women and that our programs help to provide support.”

The fitness sessions show how even small steps help build confidence for getting into the water. 

“I love hearing about the impact of the videos – it really inspires me.”

 

Useful links for delivering a sports or health promotion program online

1. How to set up a channel: https://creatoracademy.youtube.com/page/lesson/jumpstart

2. Vimeo’s easy video templates: https://vimeo.com/create

3. Tips for creating instructional videos: www.brightonwestvideo.com/blog/ and www.youtube.com/channel/UCG4ibQxtW5IUuK6hkyNTNnQ

 

Download VicHealth’s digitisation factsheets

To get more detailed information, download the digitisation fact sheets from VicHealth’s Coronavirus Hub: www.vichealth.vic.gov.au/media-and-resources/publications/covid-resources-downloads#deliveringhp

 

More information about Coasting SUP programs

Coasting for Teens gives girls aged 12–17 the opportunity to get out on the water and learn stand up paddle boarding. 

Coasting for Women is a fun and refreshing introductory stand up paddle boarding program for women that allows maximum time on the water.

Watch the Week one video and go to the website for updates: www.coastingsup.com