02 Feb, 2018 Last updated: 10 Apr, 2018

VicHealth’s strategy to increase the number of Victorians who are physically active.

Download: VicHealth's Physical Activity Strategy 2018 - 2023 (PDF, 136 KB)

  

Moving more and sitting less don’t just benefit our physical fitness and reduce the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer; moving more also protects and improves our mental wellbeing.

This is why Encouraging regular physical activity is one of our five focus areas (strategic imperatives) to 2023 as part of our Action Agenda

VicHealth’s Physical Activity Strategy aims to increase the number of Victorians who are physically active – making being active part of everyday life. 

From 2018 to 2023, we will focus on the following areas.

 


 

Children aged 5─12 years

Infographic: 4 out of 5 children (5–17 years) do not meet the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity every day. 

  • 4 out of 5 children (5–17 years) do not meet the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity every day.
  • Today’s children may be the first generation to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents.
  • By 2025, it is estimated that one in three Australian children will be overweight or obese.

 


 

Young people aged 12─17 years

Participation in physical activity halves during adolescence (down from an average of 120 minutes to just over 60 minutes a day). Sport participation levels drop suddenly at around age 15.

  • Participation in physical activity halves during adolescence - from an average of 120 minutes to 60 minutes a day.
  • Sport participation levels drop suddenly at around age 15.
  • Physically active children and youth are more socially active, have improved mental health, and perform better at school.
  • Transitioning to and from secondary school are key life stages to influence behaviours for lifelong healthy habits.

 


 

Women and girls

 

Infographic: 3 out of 5 women aren’t sufficiently active to gain health benefits from their activity. Females participate in sport at only half the rate of males.

  • 3 out of 5 women aren’t sufficiently active. Females participate in sport at only half the rate of males.
  • Women and girls face barriers to participating in sport and physical activity.
  • Women continue to be under-represented in leadership and decision-making roles within sporting organisations.
  • Coverage of women’s sport remains significantly less than coverage of men’s sport.
Our opportunity View more
  • Engage people who are less active and who experience the greatest barriers to participation
  • Connect with people at key life stages where their physical activity typically drops off, potentially leading to an inactive life

 

 

Action areas View more

Children aged 5 to 12 years

  • Support a culture and environment that normalises active travel.
  • Create more opportunities for children to play outdoors.
  • Support the development of physical literacy.

 

Young people aged 12 to 17 years

  • Develop more ways to play sport that are fun, social and local.
  • Influence the design and use of public spaces for recreation.
  • Support young people to be independently active and meaningfully involved in the design of their activity experiences.

 

Women and girls

  • Create and promote more tailored participation opportunities for women and girls.
  • Raise the profile of women’s sport and physical activity and improve attitudes towards gender equality.
  • Influence sporting environments to become more inclusive of women and girls.
Related content View more

Physical Activity

Physical activity across life stages - VicHealth has identified five life stages that give insights for engaging Victorians in physical activity.

 

Children's Physical Activity

Walk to School – VicHealth's annual campaign to encourage schoolkids to walk, ride and scoot to school.

Walk to School 2016 evaluation - This evaluation report examines the impact of VicHealth's 2016 Walk to School campaign.

Active for Life - This resource helps to better understand the challenges around children's physical activity.

 

Barriers to physical activity and sport participation

Parental fear: a barrier to the independent mobility of children -  Resources to help parents support children to safely travel and play outside independently as they grow.

Physical activity and sedentary behaviour - An evidence summary that outlines physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels in Australia and Victoria.

Victorian participation in organised sport - This research summary provides a picture of participation in organised community sport in Victoria.

Women in sport - VicHealth CEO Jerril Rechter highlights the importance of women's participation in sport.

 

Helping Victorians get active

Active Women and Girls for Health and Wellbeing - Boosting women's participation and profile in sports.

Innovation Challenge: Sport - Taking community sport and active recreation in a new direction.

Active Club Grants - Funding to increase the opportunities Victorians have to participate in community sport clubs.

This Girl Can - Celebrating women who are all kinds of active.

Walk to School - Helping our children build healthy habits for life.

Encouraging regular physical activity - More information about VicHealth's work to get people active.