05 Dec, 2013 Last updated: 27 Jan, 2015

Access to vital information on liquor licences in Victoria has been enhanced with a new map on the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation’s (VCGLR) website.

Access to vital information on liquor licences in Victoria has been enhanced with a new map on the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation’s (VCGLR) website.

The location of every one of the 19,000 liquor licences in the state has been ‘geo-coded’ and now appears on an easy-to-use interactive map.

VCGLR CEO Jane Brockington said the joint project, funded by VicHealth, means local councils, government staff, researchers and community members can easily see where licensed venues are, and then download information about them.

“The map is part of a strategy to better coordinate information so it can be shared and used by those who need it,” Ms Brockington said.

“This is a great practical example of an agency implementing the government’s DataVic Access Policy, which is all about giving people better access to government data to support research, education, innovation and evidence-based decision making in the public sector.”

Fifteen years ago there were about 9000 liquor licences across the state - today there are more than 19,000 active liquor licences. The new map shows the diversity within the sector and the variety of liquor licences and permits – from temporary licences, to late-night trading to café and restaurants, to beer and wine producers to packaged liquor licences.

“This project ticked all the boxes in VCGLR’s motivation to transform itself into a modern and efficient regulator. Central to that is using data to inform decision-making and to give members of the public greater access to reliable data,” Ms Brockington said.

VCGLR Chairman Bruce Thompson said that the interactive map will assist the Commission to make timely and efficient licensing decisions and better plan targeted education, compliance and inspection activities.

The map will be particularly useful for local residents and local government officers who can access the information and use it to have a say in liquor licensing applications, along with planning decisions. Meanwhile, VCGLR information has also been shared with the Emergency Services Telecommunications Agency and now emergency services will use this information to improve its response to Triple Zero calls.

In 2011 the VCGLR liquor licences and applications online section of the website recorded more than 11,000 visits and searches, and in 2012 this jumped to more than 27,000 searches.

To view the liquor licences map visit www.vcglr.vic.gov.au  

Media contact: John Smith on telephone (03) 9098 5133 www.vcglr.vic.gov.au